Gas Cylinder Storage – The Do’s and Dont’s

Introduction – Gas Cylinder Storage

This document provides advice and guidance for safe gas cylinder storage. It gives guidance on the construction and management of gas cylinder stores and provides information on the hazards likely to be encountered.

It shall be used when sitting and constructing storage facilities or when reviewing the safety and suitability of existing storage facilities. It does not preclude the use of alternative designs, materials, and methods when they provide equivalent standards of safety.

The content of this publication is in line with advice from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

If you need any help on a project that involves gas cylinder storage then you need to check out our Gasvault range here.

Scope

This document defines the principles of safe practice for the storage of gas cylinders and gas cylinder bundles and outlines the relevant legal requirements.

Cylinders are never fully empty unless a cylinder is new, de-valved, or following inspection and test where it has not yet been filled with a gas. Therefore, cylinders, containing a gas but regardless of the quantity of gas, shall all be treated in-line with this Code of Practice.

A gas cylinder(s) is deemed to be in storage when:

  • It is not in use; or
  • It is not being transported.

Storage of full and empty LPG cylinders and cartridges. Where a mixture of LPG (>400 kg) and other gas cylinders are stored then the applicable sections of UKLPG CP 7 (60) and this Code should be applied.

Exclusions from this Code of Practice are:

(i) Cylinders in use i.e. connected to the user equipment, or permanently connected for use; for example, fire protection systems and specifically sited emergency response equipment, such as fire extinguishers and self-contained breathing apparatus.

(ii) Cylinders being processed for filling or for periodic inspection and test.

(iii) Medical cylinders in domiciliary use.

(iv) Gas cylinders during carriage by road, rail, air, and sea.

(v) Cylinders permanently manifolded together to form part of a bulk gaseous hydrogen installation.

(vi) Transportable vacuum insulated containers.

(vii) Containers (vessels) for cryogenic liquids.

(viii) Cylinders stored off-shore.

(ix) Aerosols.

Gas Cylinder Identification

Gas Cylinder Idenification Occupational Safety and Health Administration

The cylinder label shall always be used as the primary means of identifying the contents of gas cylinders. The label will identify the product name and the class of hazard (Diamond Hazard Label(s)). Some gas cylinders may have this information stenciled on the body of the cylinder.

Colour coding is a secondary method of identifying certain gases or the properties of others, however, colour coding is not mandatory for most gases but its use is supported by the majority of gas suppliers. Colour coding is typically applied to the shoulder, or curved part, at the top of the cylinder.

Potential Hazards

Gas cylinders present a number of different hazards:

  • Size, shape and weight – Manual handling, security.
  • Pressure hazards.

Size, Shape, and Weight

Gas cylinders are generally heavy and are relatively unstable due to the base diameter to height ratio. Large cylinders can weigh over 100 kg when full they are easily toppled over. Gas cylinders are awkward objects to move safely.

Pressure Hazards

Cylinders contain gases stored under pressure and will have significant stored energy.

Any pressure above atmospheric released from a cylinder has the potential to cause injury to personnel or damage to plant or property.

Pressure can be released by:

  • Inadvertent operation of the outlet valve during handling.
  • Deliberate operation of the outlet valve.
  • Damage to the valve if cylinder topples or falls.
  • Application of heat, for example, fire.
  • Mechanical impact.
  • Leaking valve.
  • Operation of pressure relief devices.
  • Unauthorised modification of the cylinder assembly.
  • Failure of the cylinder wall, for example, from excessive internal and/or external corrosion (by reducing wall thickness).

Cylinder Store – Construction & General Principles

An Image depicting the features of the 8 Gas Cylinder Store equipped with anti corrosion aluminium checker plate, safety signage. i

Risk Assessment

All gas cylinders contain gases under pressure and may present a risk of explosion if not safely handled and stored. Legislation requires that a site-specific risk assessment is required for each gas cylinder store, refer to The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (6) and The Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR). Every storage situation must be considered on its merits and special circumstances may necessitate variations on the recommended requirements.

Consent from the local authority may need to be obtained to store quantities of dangerous substances over certain thresholds. The regulations contain thresholds for both named substances, such as oxygen and hydrogen, and for generic categories of substances (flammable, toxic). For example, the threshold for oxygen storage is 200 tonnes, for flammables 50 tonnes, but for hydrogen only 2 tonnes. In some cases, the percentage / partial faction of thresholds (for example, flammables and oxidants) are additive when determining if consent is required.

Location of the Storage Area

The majority of gas cylinders are designed so that they can be stored in the open air and, as such, they will not be adversely affected by inclement weather.

Indoor Gas Cylinder Storage Cylinder Cabinet

Storage areas should be located in an external area where there is good natural ventilation. Adjacent buildings, structures, and geographical features may adversely affect natural ventilation and their effect should be taken into account during the risk assessment. The store should not be located in low lying areas; where gases may accumulate.

Storage within a building is not recommended. Where storage indoors cannot be avoided please see below. Internal storage locations should be at ground level and in the following order of preference:

(i) A bespoke stand-alone dedicated, adequately naturally ventilated building.

(ii) A dedicated room sealed from the rest of the building, adequately naturally ventilated to the outside, only accessible from an external door(s).

(iii) A dedicated room, adjacent to an outside wall, inside a building, adequately naturally ventilated to the outside, sealed from other areas of normal occupancy.

(iv) A dedicated room, inside a building, with forced air ventilation, sealed from other areas of normal occupancy.

(v) In a building, as far as is practicable away from normal work locations.

The location of the store shall take account of the minimum recommended separation distances, refer to Section 5.4.1. Cylinder stores are to be located away from the site designated emergency exits and escape routes.

Gas cylinder storage areas should be segregated from other stores. The risk assessment shall take due regard of the potential hazards of the gases being stored and the risk from other hazardous processes or storage sites that may impact on a cylinder store. It shall also consider the potential for impact due to vehicle movements.

Storage locations should be sited at ground level. Where cylinders are stored at any other level this shall be specifically covered in the risk assessment. If the store is located at another level then consideration needs to be given to providing an area to allow vehicles to collect and deliver cylinders, cylinder movements between levels and the impact in the event of an incident, for example, gas leakage, fire, access for emergency services, proximity to people, etc.

The risk assessment shall take account of both underground and overground services. The location shall be chosen so that it is not directly beneath overhead power or other cables and where it will allow access for vehicles and other plant machinery without the risk of them coming into contact with power or other cables.

Each storage area and its boundaries shall be well defined. The footprint of the store shall allow space for the expected quantity of gas cylinders being stored as well as for the safe movement and handling of the gas cylinders, including access for mechanical handling equipment.

Appropriate access to the site will be required. This will include access for delivery vehicles and the emergency services.

The location of the storage area should consider the security of cylinders to avoid theft and to prevent tampering with the cylinders.

Storage Area Layout and Separation Distances

The physical dimensions of the storage area shall take into account the storage requirements, for example, grouping by hazard classification, full/empty or unserviceable cylinders and providing adequate space for access and egress, for safe manual handling operations and the use of mechanical handling equipment.

Means shall be provided to secure cylinders to prevent them from falling over, for example, pallets, chains, lashing, etc.

Minimum Recommended Separation Distances

Appendix 2 shows the minimum recommended separation distances between cylinders, the store(s) and other features.

Where there are space restraints a permanent physical partition may be used to help achieve the required minimum recommended separation distances. The height of the partition should be relevant to the hazard, however, it should be not less than 2 meters high, unless for non-fire hazards a lower partition can be justified through risk assessment. The required minimum recommended separation distance can include the length of the sides of the partition, as shown in Figure 1. Such partitions should be imperforate and constructed of suitable materials, for example, solid masonry or concrete. Where protecting against fire hazards, they should be constructed to achieve at least 30 minutes’ fire-resistance for best practices in gas cylinder storage.

Correct Seperaration Distances

Where the wall separates vulnerable populations from the cylinders (not including inert gases), the fire resistance provided should be a minimum of 60 minutes.

Figure 1: Use of a partition to achieve the minimum recommended separation distances

Within Figure 1 the minimum recommended separation distances may include the distance measured around the sides of the partition by determining the sum of A + B + C.

If flammable gas cylinders are stored against a building wall the area up to 2 m either side of the storage area and up to 9 m above ground should be imperforate and of a minimum of 30 minutes fire resisting construction.

When planning the gas cylinder storage facility, adequate handling space shall be allowed. The total amount of floor space required will depend on the quantity and the size of the cylinders, and the handling equipment to be used during their movement. Refer to Section 6 and Section 8.

Floor

The floor should be level and constructed from non-combustible, non-porous material. All floor surfaces shall be constructed so that they can be maintained in a clean manner.

Obstacles such as expansion joints, steps, and drainage systems, shall not impede cylinder handling operations.

The floor shall be of sufficient strength to support the weight of the gas cylinders/gas cylinder pallets, plus any mechanical handling aids employed on gas cylinder handling.

The floor should be laid to prevent the accumulation of water so that stored cylinders do not rest in standing water and risk being subjected to corrosion.

Roof

Cylinders are designed for outdoor storage, however, some applications require protected storage conditions for quality, hygiene and security reasons, for example, analytical and medical gases. Cylinders may also need additional protection from local environmental conditions.

Where required, the roofing shall be designed to prevent gas pockets from accumulating, for example, gaps between the wall and sloping roof, natural ventilation in the roof apex etc.

General Security

All stores containing gas cylinders shall be secure and access shall be restricted to authorized personnel. This may be achieved by securing the site with a boundary fence with lockable gates or by securing individual stores. Dependant on the site security requirements both conditions may be required.

Suitable security arrangements shall take into account the classification of the gases and the quantities being stored. The security arrangements shall include appropriate physical and management security controls to prevent unauthorized access, theft, tampering, arson, vandalism and to effectively monitor the usage of gases, as well as any specific local considerations. Keys for each store shall be kept in a secure location and only issued to authorized persons; a log should be kept.

Where electronic security systems, for example, alarms, are installed comply with the electrical requirements on site.

The security perimeter shall meet the ventilation requirements and be not less than 1.8 meters high.

Where the gas cylinder store is enclosed, a suitable emergency exit(s) may be required dependant on the size and/or layout of the store.

All persons handling gas cylinders shall have appropriate training, as required.

Where high consequence dangerous goods, such as toxic gases, are stored on site a security plan shall be drawn up and implemented in compliance with the Health & Safety department.

Ventilation

Ventilation is required to ensure that any small leakage of gas is adequately dispersed and will prevent a hazardous atmosphere being created. An outdoor store with open or ventilated sides and is considered to provide adequate ventilation and is the preferred option.

Where a store may have restricted ventilation, due to, for example, adjacent buildings or a wall acting as a store boundary, it is necessary to ensure that there is through and thorough ventilation in all areas inside the store.

A semi-enclosed store may be considered ‘outdoors’ if it consists of up to three adjacent solid sides, with a roof, provided at least 25 % of the perimeter is constructed to ensure that ventilation is not impaired, for example, meshed cladding.

Where the configuration of the store restricts air flow, the installation of high and low-level vents should be considered to ensure a regular change of air. The design of a roof shall meet the ventilation requirements. Minimum recommended separation distances should be considered when locating vents.

A store with less than 25 % of the perimeter open is to be considered an indoor store.

Examples of store design are displayed below.

If a store is located against a building wall, then the risk assessment shall take account of the likelihood of escaped gas entering the building, and the method of entry, for example, an overhanging roof, cellars, windows, air intakes, etc.

Gas Cylinders Storage

Access

Gas Cylinder Cage

The storage area should be located so that it is readily accessible for cylinder movements with manual handling distances kept to a minimum and clear access maintained at all times for deliveries and the emergency services.

Access to the delivery and storage area(s) is to be kept clear, with no parking allowed, except for the loading and unloading of cylinders. No vehicles are to be allowed within the minimum recommended separation distance.

Aisles should be provided to allow safe access to cylinders, to facilitate good housekeeping, stock control and for the ease of handling. They should be a minimum of 1 metre wide.

The layout of the storage area should allow for the safe movement of gas cylinder handling trolleys, forklift trucks, and any other powered vehicles. The layout shall take account of the separation of personnel and vehicles with appropriate traffic routes defined.

Where the gas cylinder store is enclosed suitable access and egress shall be provided. The risk assessment (refer to Section 5.1) shall determine the maximum travel distance to enable escape and therefore identify the number of exits required.

Where installed, all designated emergency exits shall open in the direction of escape and shall be fitted with panic furniture of a type not requiring a key, card, or code to open. They are to provide an unobstructed means of escape and in operation shall not obstruct any other escape route. These exits shall be properly identified by signage and maintained in a serviceable condition at all times. Ensure that emergency exits are secure and cannot be opened from the external side of the store (whilst still allowing emergency escape from the inside of the store).

Lighting

The area should have adequate lighting to assist in providing a safe work environment, to allow the identification of the cylinder contents, signage and where necessary to assist with security. Where artificial lighting is used it shall give suitable colour rendering to enable colour labelling to be easily recognised by persons with normal colour vision.

Where required, emergency lighting shall be to the requirements of BS 5266 (28).

Electrical Equipment

Only electrical equipment that is necessary for the safe and practical operation of the gas cylinder store shall be installed. As a minimum, all electrical installations shall conform to BS 7671 (31), Requirements for electrical installations. IET wiring regulations. Where flammable or oxidising gases are stored the risk assessment (refer to Section 5.1) is to determine whether protected electrical equipment is required, if so refer to BS EN 60079, Part 14 (33), Explosive atmospheres. Electrical installations, design, selection, and erection.

Fire Safety Requirements

A responsible person shall carry out a Fire Safety Risk Assessment on all gas cylinder storage areas to determine the hazard and the risk associated with a fire originating from a gas cylinder and/or a fire impacting on a gas cylinder(s). The findings from which are to be incorporated into the Site Fire Safety Management Plan that is to be implemented and maintained. As necessary, advice should be sought from the Fire and Rescue Service. The risk control measures identified shall be incorporated into the construction of the gas cylinder store(s).

The location of each gas cylinder store shall be recorded within the site’s hazardous locations record. This record should include information on the products stored, their maximum quantities and their hazardous classification. This should be updated on a regular basis. This is to be made available to the emergency services in the event of an incident.

Training

Training Presentation

All personnel who are required to handle and store gas cylinders shall receive suitable information and instruction regarding the hazards associated with gas cylinders and the gases being stored, and provided with the necessary skills and knowledge to carry out their job safely.

It is the duty of the employer to ensure their persons are adequately trained and to establish competency. It is recommended that a training programme is carried out under a formalised system where an acceptable level of competency has to be achieved. Records shall be kept of the training provided and the competence level achieved. The training programme shall make provision for periodic re-training.

Training should be reviewed and/or updated following:

  • A related accident or incident.
  • The receipt of gases which have not previously been used on site.
  • Change to guidance or information previously provided.
  • The appointment of new and/or transferred employees.

All persons engaged in the storage of gas cylinders shall have training commensurate with their responsibilities and should include, but not confined to the below subjects.

  • Identification of the cylinder and its contents.
  • Properties and hazards of gases, including pressure.
  • Cylinder and valve types.
  • Movement of cylinders, including local carriage.
  • Stock management.
  • Store management.
  • Actions to be taken in an emergency situation.

Specific training and certification requirements are required for persons handling fluorinated gases.

If you require further help from the team at Chemstore then get in touch with one of our sales engineers today!

Flammable Material Storage – Eliminating the Risk

Eliminating the Risk – Handling & Flammable Material Storage

flammable symbol risk

Flammable materials are substances that can ignite easily and burn rapidly. They can be common materials that are at most work sites in gas, liquid and solid forms. Proper flammable material storage needs to be followed to avoid an accident in the workplace. Some flammable materials which pose a risk include:

Gases — Natural gas, propane, butane, methane, acetylene, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulphide. Flammable gases usually have with a lower explosive limit of less than 13% in the air or have a flammable range in air of at least 12%. For example, butane is a flammable gas because its lower explosive limit in the air is 20%. Carbon monoxide has a lower explosive limit of 13% and an upper explosive limit of 74% in air, it is flammable over a range of 61%.

Liquids —  Many solvents such as acetone, alcohols and toluene, paints and paint thinners, adhesives, degreasers, cleaners, waxes and polishes. Flammable liquids have a flashpoint below 37.8⁰C (100⁰ F).

Solids — Some types of coal, pyrophoric metals (metals that burn in contact with air or water, such as sodium and potassium) solid wastes that are soaked with flammable liquids (rags, paper, spill clean-up products) and matches.

To read more about our best-in-class flammable materials storage, read up on our Fireavault range here.

How Do Fires Occur

For a fire to occur, three elements must come together at the same time and in the right proportions, fuel, heat (ignition source) and oxygen. Remove any of the elements and the fire will go out.

The “fire triangle” is commonly used as a model to understand how a fire starts and how it can be prevented.

Fuel — Fuels are flammable or combustible materials and can be gases, liquids or solids.

Heat — These are ignition sources and include an open flame, lit cigarette and sparks (such as from electrical current and static electricity shorts). A chemical reaction that creates heat can also ignite a fuel and oxygen mixture.

Oxygen — The most common source of oxygen is air, but oxygen can also come from chemicals called oxidizers. Examples of common oxidizers are some types of acids and chemicals such as chlorine, chlorine dioxide, potassium permanganate and potassium chlorate.

Fire Triangle Combustion Triangle Diagram

The spread of fire is also dependant on a fourth factor, the chemical chain reactions that occur after the fire is started. Fire prevention consists of making sure that the three legs of the fire triangle never meet. It is important to note that a fire will not always start even when the legs of the triangle meet unless all three elements are present in the right amounts. For example, vapours from a flammable liquid must be mixed with a certain amount of air and exposed to the right amount of heat to ignite and burn. Once vapours from a flammable liquid have ignited, the flames may “flash-back”. This means the flames travel back, through the vapour air mixture, to the container or source of the flammable liquid. This can create an explosion. Most flammable liquids produce vapours that are heavier than air. Some flammable gases are also heavier than air. These gases and vapours can spread a considerable distance along the ground or floor and be ignited by a distant spark or flame or source of heat. Certain chemicals such as organic peroxides (e.g. benzoyl peroxide) contain both fuel and oxygen.

Work Procedures and Training

The employer must develop work procedures for the use and storage of flammable materials and ensure workers are trained on these procedures. Because of the potential fire hazard, the employer will also need to have additional procedures in place to deal with fires and spills.

Work procedures should address:

Training Presentation
  • Storage
  • Dispensing
  • Spill clean up
  • Incompatible materials
  • Use and maintenance of engineering controls used in the workplace (such as ventilation)
  • Required personal protective equipment for handling flammable products
  • Fire protection and prevention

Storage of Flammable Materials

In general, flammable materials must not be stored near exits, electrical equipment or heating equipment. They should always be stored in a separate, well-ventilated storage area, away from potential sources of ignition. If the material is removed from its original container, it must be placed into a container that is appropriate for flammable materials.

Portable Storage Containers for Flammable Liquids

When flammable liquids are transferred from their original container (one they were purchased in), or from bulk storage such as a drum or tank, the proper type of portable container must be used. Containers that are approved for the use and storage of “portable quantities” are usually made of metal or plastic, are vapour-proof and have:

flammable material storage cabinet Q90
  • Welded seams.
  • Spark or flame arrestors.
  • Pressure release valves or spring closing lids with spout covers.

Portable containers must be properly labelled. The labelling should include the following information:

  • Container contents
  • The contents are flammable
  • The container should be kept away from ignition sources (heat, spark, open flames)
  • The container should be kept closed when not in use
  • A reference to the “SDS” material safety data sheet for the product.

Storage Cabinets

flammable material storage cabinet under desk

When individual containers of flammable liquids are not in use and are stored inside a building, they should be stored in a storage cabinet. The European Standard EN 14470-1 was implemented in April 2004 and has since been published as a national standard in many European countries as the Netherlands, France, Ireland, Spain, UK, Italy etc.

Since the 1st of January 2005, the former German Standard DIN 12925-1 can no longer be taken into consideration for testing Safety Storage Cabinets.

Test and construction requirements, compared to the DIN 12925-1, have become stricter and in some details stated more precisely. The following points describe the basics and main safety, test and construction requirements.

The range of applications

– The standard specifies the performance required of the design and fire resistance of safety storage cabinets used for storing flammable liquids in working areas.

The principal safety requirements

– Minimisation of the fire risk associated with the storage of flammable materials.

– Protection of the contents of the cabinet in the event of a fire for a known (and tested) period of time.

– Minimisation of the fumes released to the working environment.

– Retention of any possible leakage within the cabinet.

– Provision of enough time, in the event of a fire, for personnel to leave the room,

and sufficient time for fire service personnel to enter the building before the

stored materials turn a small fire into an uncontrollable blaze.

Fire protection

– In the event of a fire the cabinet must ensure that, over a period of time defined by the manufacturer (but in any event at least 15 minutes), its contents do not present an additional risk that the fire will spread.

 Doors

– The cabinet doors must close entirely, starting from any position (closing time max. 20 seconds).

– Immobilising equipment fitted must release the locked doors at a temperature of 50 (-10) °C.

– Avoiding the risk of injury: the closing force of the doors must not exceed 100 N.

– One-handed operation must be possible, and the doors must close entirely even if open and locked.

Side and rear walls

– The side and rear walls of the cabinet must have the same thickness and comparable structures.

Air inlet and outlet openings

– The cabinets must have openings for air inlet and outlet (for connection of the cabinet to an exhaust system).

– The ventilation openings must close automatically at a temperature of 70 °C.

flammable material storage cabinet long

Storage locations (shelves or drawers)

– Storage surfaces must be able to support the loading specified by the manufacturer throughout the test in the furnace. Design evidence of the load-carrying capacity of shelves and drawers in the event of fire based on EN 1365 (fire resistance tests for self-supporting components).

Spill containment sump

– The spill containment sump must retain its ability to function after the fire resistance test. This is to be checked visually by filling the spill containment sump with water

Fire resistance

– Must be investigated by tests on a design sample.

– The fire-resistant cabinet is exposed to flames in a suitable furnace.

– The doors, walls and ceiling of the cabinet being tested must be exposed to the same heating conditions.

– Cabinets must be tested as free-standing single cabinets. The example being tested must be positioned with its rear wall at least 100 mm from the furnace wall.

– The flame exposure is carried out under the standard temperature curve of BS EN 1363-1.

– The temperature rise is measured inside the cabinet.

– The cabinet must then be classed as type 15, 30, 60 or 90, according to the time that has elapsed before the temperature rose by 180K.

Large Fire Rated Store – Firevault

At some work sites, there are many different types of flammable materials or large volumes of particular materials used. At these sites, flammable materials may be stored in large containers (drums or tanks) or there may be a specific flammable material storage room. The specific requirements for above ground storage tanks and storage rooms is HSg51.

flammable material storage firevault

In general:

  • Do not store other types of chemicals beside bulk storage containers for flammable materials or in storage rooms for these products.
  • Bulk storage containers should be located away from potential ignition sources such as heat, sparks or open flames.
  • Do not store compressed gases beside flammable material containers.
  • Bulk storage areas should be equipped with spill protection.
  • Bulk storage areas and rooms must have appropriate signage or placards.
  • Smoking should never be allowed near flammable material storage areas.
  • Drums or large containers of flammable materials should never be stored beside exits or in a way that blocks access.
  • Make sure that storage rooms have properly designed ventilation systems that are regularly maintained.
  • Minimum separation distances from the occupied building, boundary, process unit, flammable liquid storage tank or ignition source (metres) Fig 1.
Quantity Stored (L) Distance (M)
Up to 1,0002
1,000 to 100,0004
Above 100,000 7.5

Handling Flammable Materials

flammable risk barrel

To prevent fires, flammable materials must be properly managed in the workplace. There are three main ways to prevent fires:

Limit the amounts of flammable and combustible materials

  • Keep only what you need on-site
  • Purchase materials in the smallest volumes necessary
  • At work locations, keep only those chemicals that are needed for the present task
  • Do not let hazardous wastes accumulate at the worksite
  • Store products, including wastes, used at the worksite in proper containers
  • Keep flammable materials separate from other processes and storage areas

Provide proper ventilation to ensure flammable vapours do not accumulate

  • Install properly designed ventilation in the storage area
  • Ensure that processes that use or make flammable materials do not exhaust back in the work site
  • Ensure that equipment, such as spray booths, where flammable materials are used, is exhausted outside of the building, and away from air intakes
  • Ventilation systems must be properly maintained and comply with local regulations

Control ignition sources

Danger flammable liquids risk
  • Ground and bond all work and ignition-proof equipment
  • Ensure that there is no smoking in work areas where flammable materials are stored or used
  • Never store flammable materials near hot equipment or open flames
  • Use intrinsically safe and non-sparking tools It is important for the employer to assess the worksite and identify potential fire hazards. This will allow the employer to identify the best ways to control these hazards.

Static Electricity

Static electricity is an electric charge that cannot move. It is created when two objects or materials that are in contact with each other are separated. While the objects are in contact, the surface electricity charges try to balance each other. When the objects are separated, they are left with either an excess or shortage of electrons, causing them both to become electrically charged. If these charges do not have a path to the ground, they are unable to move and becomes “static”. If static electricity is not quickly removed, the charge will build up. Eventually, it will develop enough energy to jump as a spark to some nearby less highly charged object. In an explosive or flammable atmosphere, the spark can set off an explosion or fire. The danger is greatest when flammable liquids are being poured or transferred.

Static electricity can be produced by:

Static electricity fire hazard
  • Non-polar liquid flowing through a pipe or hose (e.g. hydrocarbons)
  • Spraying
  • Blending or mixing
  • Filling containers or tanks
  • Movement (and friction) between materials
  • Movement of dry powdered material through chutes or conveyors
  • Movement of non-conductive conveyor belts or drive belts
  • Appliances that are plugged into electrical outlets
  • Flipping a light switch on or off

Static electricity can be controlled by:

  • Bonding and grounding
  • Humidification
  • Static collectors
  • Additives

Bonding and grounding are techniques that are used to prevent sparks (a source of ignition) from being created when liquids are transferred between containers. Bonding is when there is an electrical connection between two or more conductive containers. Bonding ensures that the containers have the same electrical charge. Without a difference in charge, a spark cannot be created that jumps from one container to another. Bonding does not eliminate the static charge which is why it is used in combination with grounding. A container is grounded when there is an electrical connection between the container and the earth. Grounding quickly drains the static charge away.

If you have any questions about our Firevault range or flameproof cabinets, get in touch today by calling, emailing or using the Live Chat feature on the bottom left corner of your screen.

Hand Sanitiser Storage, Are you aware of the Fire Risks?

The outbreak of The COVID 19 pandemic has shaken global society. All aspects of life are affected, and containing the spread of the virus during, and post lockdown is now the main priority. Masks, gloves and hand sanitiser are quickly becoming the norm. This has made safe and proper hand sanitiser storage essential.

We are all working to reduce the risk of further outbreaks of the virus and public safety is a priority.

The health of our economy also poses a considerable risk, and we need as a society to ensure that the country gets back on its feet to maintain jobs and income while sticking to the guidelines.

 

hand sanitiser article feature image

We are all familiar with the guidelines issued by the government and as we enter the latter stages of restriction lifting, and more businesses and schools prepare to reopen.

It is now more critical than ever that we consider all the risks and spend time carrying out assessments regularly.

Hand Sanitiser consumption and demand has exploded over the last few months since the outbreak, and most workplaces across the country are installing sanitising means for employees and customers which is a very positive step for hygiene reducing the spread of the virus.

As schools, hospitals, creches, and all other businesses introduce new requirements, including the use of hand sanitiser, there is a need to recognise the fire risk storing hand sanitiser in bulk creates.

We have already had numerous companies contact us regarding bulk hand sanitiser storage of this product and looking for advice.

What is Hand Sanitiser made from?

Antibacterial Hand Sanitiser is predominantly manufactured using Alcohol and Triethanolamine. The product ranges from 60 – 80% alcohol and by its nature is a highly flammable liquid and an eye and skin irritant

what is it made from hand sanitiiser

Pure Alcohol has a flashpoint of 13 degrees, and Sanistiser with concentrations of 70% alcohol can be as low as 15 degrees which creates a serious fire hazard if storing the product in bulk on your premises.

fire safety flammable

Storage Guidelines

As with any flammable liquid, it is essential when storing bulk quantities that adequate safety measures are taken.

Flammable materials must not be stored near exits, electrical equipment or heating equipment. They should always be stored in a separate, well-ventilated storage area, away from potential sources of ignition. If the material is removed from its original container, it must be placed into a container that is appropriate for flammable materials.

We recommend storing flammable Hand Santiser in a certified safety cabinet or with bulk quantities above 1000 Litres in an external store that is bunded and has a certified Fire Resistance.

For specialist advice for how to safely handle and store Hand Sanitiser please contact Chemstore today for a free no obligations site assessment or to discuss your specific concerns.

Respirators

FFP2 Valved Disposable Respirator

CE standards: EN 149:2001+A1:2009

EN 149 2001 +A1:2009 Symbol

FFP2 (N95) rated protection level

 

Description

-Acupuncture cotton +Filter+PP

-Plastic/Metal nose clip, spandex ear-loop

-Colour: White

-Customized labelling and packaging

-Simple, comfortable cup design shaped to fit user’s face

 

Protective Suits

Coveralls

Chemical Microporous Coverall

Microporous fabric provides soft and flexible fitting wearing.
Seams with high protection of particulates and low level of liquid sprays or splashes.

– Microporous fabric in 3 different gsm for Standard, Heavy duty and light-weight choices.

– with hood and elasticated face opening/wrist/ankles

– available for knitted cuffs, thumb loops, and reflective tape

– anti-static treatment

– white AND blue colours available

 

Protection Level

CE Cat. III, Type 5B, 6B

Product use

EN 14126 Safety Symbol

·  Biological hazards and infective agents

–  Painting and dustproof

·  Industrial cleaning

·  Emergency services

·  Industrial pharmaceutical manufacturing

–  Agriculture and veterinary service

 

3 Ply Disposable Face Masks

 

3Ply Disposable Face Mask

 

 

Disposable Face Masks

 

 

Description

-PP+Filter+PP

-Nose clip, spandex ear-loop

-Colour: White/blue/green/black or others

-17.5*9.5cm

-BFE 95%/99%

-20+20+25gsm

 

Protection level

EN14683, Nelson Labs test report on request

 

Product use

  • Surgical
  • Medical Procedure
  • Laboratory Use
  • Industry
  • Dental

 

Disposable Safety Gloves

Hand Protection

Disposable Safety Gloves
Lightly Powdered & Powder Free Nitrile Gloves that provide excellent resistance against abrasions, cuts, solvent, oils and greases. 100 Gloves per pack.

 

Quality Signs & Certificates
G 10
D 5250
89/686/EEC, 93/42/EWG
ISO 9001:2008, ISO 13485, CMDCAS 13485 (SGS)
EN 455 1-4
EN 420 : 2003 + A 1 : 2009
EN 374 2-3, EN 388
EN 1186: Food Contact Approved (SGS)

Nitrile Safety Gloves Certs

 

Get ready for winter with temperature-controlled storage

How do colder months affect chemical storage in the workplace?

As winter approaches and colder temperatures start to hit, it’s worth remembering that climate has an impact on quality and safety.

BP2
A fuel-testing module supplied by Chemstore to a BP UK site

Quality control
Temperature control is a critical factor when storing quantities of valuable products such as solvents, adhesives and coatings. It is essential in many industrial processes to maintain the optimal temperatures for these products to obtain the highest product quality for goods produced. For processes such as paint mixing, adhesive appliances and ingredient storage – companies need correct temperature controlled storage that is both compliant and fit for purpose.

Chemstore specialises in the manufacture of bespoke temperature controlled chemical stores that can be designed specifically for your product requirements.

Click here to see one of Chemstore’s temperature controlled solutions in action featuring the new touch-screen delta control panel.

For more information, just contact one of our sales team today and get prepared for the winter ahead. Call +44 20 8704 1807 or  email sales@chemstore.co.uk

Privacy Policy – Compliance With General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Protection Policy

 

 

CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd is committed to conducting its business in accordance with all applicable Data Protection laws and regulations in line with the highest standards of ethical conduct.

This policy outlines the expected behaviours of CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd employees and any third parties in relation to the use, retention, disclosure, transfer and destruction of any personal data belonging to a Data Subject CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd is associated with.

Organisational methods for keeping data secure are essential and CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd believes that it is good practice to keep clear records supported by strong procedures.  Line managers are responsible for ensuring compliance with the principles of the GDPR and to adhere to CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd’s Data Protection Policy.

This policy is designed to comply with the requirements set out under the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR).

This policy will be implemented in conjunction with the other CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd Data Privacy documents including:

  1. The Data Protection Notice
  2. Data Processor Agreements
  3. Data Protection Impact Statement

Definitions

Term Definition
Data Information in a form that can be processed.  It includes both automated data and manual data.
Automated data Any information on computer or information recorded with the intention of putting it on a computer.
Manual data Information that is kept as part of a relevant filing system, or with the intention that it should form part of a relevant filing system.
Data Controller A person who (either alone or with others) controls the contents and use of personal data.  A data controller is the individual or the legal person who controls and is responsible for the keeping and use of the personal information on computer or in a structured manual file.
Data Processor A person who processes personal data on behalf of a data controller but does not include an employee of a data controller who processes such data in the course of his employment.  If an organisation or person holds or processes personal data but does not exercise responsibility for or control over the personal data, then they are deemed to be a “data processor”.
Data Protection Officer (DPO) A CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd officer with responsibility for the Data Protection compliance of the organisation.
Data Subject A data subject is an individual who is the subject of personal data that is held by a data controller or processed by a data processor
 

 

Data Protection Impact Statement (DPIA)

 

 

A DPIA describes the process designed to identify the risks arising out of the processing of personal data and minimisation of these risks as far and as early as possible.  DPIAs are important tools for negating risk, and for demonstrating compliance, including ongoing compliance, with the GDPR.

GDPR The new EU General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) – Regulation 2016/679 which comes into effect in May 2018 and replaces the current Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC and the Irish Data Protection Acts.
Personal data Data relating to a living individual who is or can be identified either from the data or from the data in conjunction with other information that is in, or is likely to come into, the possession of a data controller.
Processing Processing means performing any operation or set of operations on data, including:

·       Obtaining, recording or keeping data;

·       Collecting, organising, storing, altering or adapting the data;

·       Retrieving, consulting or using the data;

·       Disclosing the information or data by transmitting;

·       Disseminating or otherwise making it available;

·       Aligning, combining, blocking, erasing or destroying the data.

 

Retention Policy How long will CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd hold an individual’s personal data?  This will be influenced by a number of factors. Data must be retained for the least amount of time and will be stored securely and deleted at the appropriate time.
Sensitive Personal Data Any personal data relating to a person’s racial origin; political opinions or religious or other beliefs; physical or mental health; sexual life’; criminal convictions or the alleged commission of an offence; trade union membership.

Principles

Pursuant to the GDPR, the personal data that CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd holds will be:

  • Processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner in relation to individuals.
  • Collected for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes and not processed in a manner which is incompatible with those purposes.
  • Adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary in relation to the purposes for which they are processed.
  • Accurate and where necessary, kept up to date. CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will take all reasonable steps to ensure that all data which are irrelevant for the purposes for which they are collected shall be deleted.
  • Kept in a form which permits identification of data subjects for no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which the personal data are processed.
  • Held securely and protected against unauthorised or unlawful processing and against accidental loss or damage.
  • The DPO shall be responsible for, and be able to, demonstrate compliance and that the above principles are met and to give a copy of the Data Subject’s data on request or to delete it where appropriate.

Legal Basis for collecting data

CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will process Personal Data in accordance with all applicable laws and contractual obligations.  CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will not process personal data unless at least one of the following requirements are met:

  1. The Data Subject has given consent to the processing of their personal data for one or more specific purposes
  2. Processing is necessary for the performance of a contract to which the Data Subject is party or in order to take steps at the request of the Data Subject prior to entering into a contract.
  • Processing is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which the Data Controller is subject
  1. Processing is necessary in order to protect the vital interests of the Data Subject or of another natural person
  2. Processing is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in the Data Controller.
  3. Processing is necessary for the purposes of the legitimate interests pursued by the Data Controller or by a Third Party (except where such interests are overridden by the interests or fundamental rights and freedoms of the Data Subject).

Rights of Users

Right to be informed.

The privacy notice supplied to individuals in regard to the processing of their personal data will be written in clear, plain language which is concise, transparent and easily accessible.

Where data is obtained directly from the data subject, information regarding whether the provision of personal data is part of a statutory or contractual requirement and the details of the categories of personal data, as well as any possible consequences of failing to provide the personal data, will be provided.  Where data is not obtained directly from that data subject, information regarding the source the personal data originates from and whether it came from publicly accessible sources, will be provided.

Right to access. Any Data Subject may contact CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd to confirm whether or not the Data Subject’s personal data is being processed. The categories of personal data processed will be clarified as well as the purposes for processing, the categories of recipients to whom personal data have been or will be disclosed and the envisaged storage period or criteria to determine that period.  Where a request is manifestly unfounded, excessive or repetitive, a reasonable fee will be charged.  All requests will be responded to without delay and at the latest, within one month of receipt.

Right to withdraw consent. Where consent is the basis for the processing of data the Data Subject may withdraw the consent at any time by contacting the DPO.

Right to rectification. Any Data Subject has the right to have inaccurate or incomplete personal data stored about them rectified.  Requests for rectification will be responded to within one month; this will be extended by two months where the request is complex.

Right to object. In case processing is based on a legitimate interest to run, maintain and develop the business CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd, any Data Subject has the right to object at any time to processing of the Data Subject’s personal data unless for the provision of business or if CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd demonstrate other compelling legitimate grounds for processing that override the Data Subject’s interests, rights and freedoms, or for legal claims. Notwithstanding any consent granted beforehand for direct marketing purposes, any Data Subject has the right to prohibit CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd from using his/her personal data for direct marketing purposes, by contacting the DPO or by unsubscribing from direct marketing messages.

Right to restriction of processing. Individuals have the right to block or suppress CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd processing of personal data.  The processing of personal data will be restricted:

  1. Where an individual contests the accuracy of the data held and where CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd has verified the inaccuracy.
  2. Where an individual had objected to the processing and CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd is considering whether their legitimate grounds override those of the individual
  • Where the processing is unlawful and the individual opposes erasure and requests restriction instead
  1. Where CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd no longer needs the personal data but the individual requires the data to establish, exercise or defend a legal claim.

Right to data portability. Any Data Subject has the right to receive Data Subject’s personal data from us in a structured, commonly used and machine-readable format.

Right to erasure. Data Subjects may request the deletion or removal of personal data where there is no compelling reason for its continued processing.  This would include:

  1. Where the personal data is no longer necessary in relation to the purpose for which it was originally collected/processed
  2. When the Data Subject withdraws their consent
  • When the Data Subject objects to the processing and there is no overriding legitimate interest for continuing the processing
  1. The personal data was unlawfully processed
  2. The personal data is required to be erased in order to comply with a legal obligation.

CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd may object to a request for erasure:

  1. To exercise the right of freedom of expression and information
  2. To comply with a legal obligation
  • For public health purposes in the public interest
  1. The exercise or defence of a legal claim.

Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) and Data Protection Design

PIAs are compulsory under the GDPR.  It is essentially a risk assessment of proposed processing of personal data that is likely to result in a high risk of the data subject’s rights.  A PIA must be carried out prior to commencing that processing.  It should be noted that if CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd comes to the attention of the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner, the PIA will be the first line of defence.

Conducting a PIA will improve awareness in CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd of the data protection risks associated with a project.  Carrying out a PIA is good practice and a useful tool to help CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd as Data Controller to comply with protection law. This will help to improve the design of your project and enhance your communication about data privacy risks with relevant stakeholders. Some of the benefits of conducting a DPIA are as follows:

  • Ensuring and demonstrating that CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd complies with the GDPR and avoids sanctions.
  • Inspiring confidence in the public by improving communications about data protection issues.
  • Ensuring data subjects are not at risk of their data protection rights being violated.
  • Enabling CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd to incorporate “data protection by design” into new projects.
  • Reducing operation costs by optimising information flows within a project and eliminating unnecessary data collection and processing.
  • Reducing data protection related risks to CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd.
  • Reducing the cost and disruption of data protection safeguards by integrating them into project design at an early stage.

Data Protection by design means embedding data privacy features and data privacy enhancing technologies directly into the design of projects at an early stage. This will help to ensure better and more cost-effective protection for individual data privacy.

Data Protection Officer (DPO)

A DPO will be appointed to:

  • Inform and advise CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd and its employees about their obligations to comply with the GDPR and other data protection laws;
  • Monitor CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd’s compliance with GDPR and other laws, including managing internal data protection activities, advising on data protection impact assessments, conducting internal audits and providing the required training to staff members.

The DPO will report to the highest level of management at CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd.  Sufficient resources will be provided to the DPO to enable them to meet their GDPR requirements.

All enquiries should be made in writing to privacy@chemstore.ie or privacy@chemstore.co.uk.

Direct Marketing

Direct marketing can be described as the communication (by whatever means) of any advertising or marketing material which is directed at particular individuals. Consent is central to the rules on direct marketing and CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will strive to obtain an individual’s consent before sending any marketing material.  To be valid, consent must be knowingly and freely given, clear and specific.  CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will keep a clear record of what has been consented to, when are where this consent has been obtained so that compliance may be demonstrated in the event of a complaint.

The clearest way of obtaining consent is to invite the customer to tick an opt-in box confirming that they wish to receive marketing messages via specific channels.  CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will strive, in conjunction with their IT Support, to ensure that communication involves a positive action on the part of the individual to consent to direct marketing.  There will be a clear and positive statement explaining that the action indicates consent to receive marketing messages from CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd.  Best practice is to provide an unticked opt-in box and invite the person to confirm their agreement by ticking.  CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will ensure that the language used is clear and easy to understand.

The right to object to marketing is absolute and CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd must stop processing for these purposes when someone objects. This is so for business to business marketing.

Data Access Request (DAR) and Data Rectification or Deletion Requests (DRDR) – Procedures

  1. All data access requests directed to CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd must be in writing. On receipt of a request from a data subject please advise them to put the request in writing and address it to the relevant company officer (DPO).
  2. Ensure the letter of request is date-stamped on receipt. CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd must reply to the request within 40 days of receipt of same.
  3. The relevant company officer must ensure that the request is valid and sufficient identification is required in order to identify the data subject.
  4. No administration fee will be charged for considering and/or complying with such a request unless the request is deemed to be unnecessary or excessive in nature.
  5. If the request cannot be fully complied with within the time frame the DPO shall provide the following information to the Data Subject
    1. An acknowledgement of the receipt of the request
    2. Any information located to date
    3. Details for any requested information which will not be provided to the Data Subject, the reason(s) for refusal, and any procedures available for appealing the decision
    4. An estimated date by which any remaining responses will be provided
    5. An estimate of any costs to be paid by the Data Subject (e.g. where the request is excessive in nature)
    6. The name and contact details of the CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd individual to be contacted for follow up.
  6. It should be noted that it may arise where providing the information requested by the Data Subject would disclose Personal data about another individual and in such cases, information must be redacted or withheld a may be necessary or appropriate to protect that person’s rights.
  7. A search should be undertaken within CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd no matter what the format and all data identified should be reviewed by the DPO.
  8. A final decision on disclosure/deletion of the requested information will be taken by the DPO, in conjunction with any other Director of CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd where appropriate and as required.
  9. The extracted data is collated into an easily understood format and sent by registered post to the Data Subject.
  10. For DRDR the information is deleted from each of the systems on which it is located, including shredding of hardcopy documents. The IT administrator should be informed that the information should be fully deleted from the system.
  11. The DPO will keep copies of all DAR and DRDR requests on a registered file.

Data Protection Training

All CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd employees that have access to Personal Data will have their responsibilities under this policy outlined to them as part of their staff induction training.

Further information and guidance can be obtained on the Data Protection Commissioner’s website www.dataprotection.ie.

Third-Party Processors

In the course of its role as Data Controller, CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd engages a number of Data Processors to process Personal Data on its behalf. In each case, a formal, written contract is in place with the Processor, outlining their obligations in relation to the Personal Data, the specific purpose or purposes for which they are engaged, and the understanding that they will process the data in compliance with the Irish Data Protection legislation and the GDPR.

These Data Processors include:

–         Salesforce

–         FBS Business Systems

–         Pegasus Opera

–         TNT

–         O’Carroll Crane Hire & Haulage

–         Aqua Trans International Ltd.

–         Gore Transport

–         Expeditors

This list may be amended as required.

Sending Personal Data Outside the EEA

Personal data shall not be transferred to a country or territory outside the EEA unless that county or territory ensures an adequate level of protection for the rights and freedoms of data subjects in relation to the processing of personal data.

CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will transfer personal data only where the organisation receiving the personal data has provided adequate safeguards. Individuals’ rights must be enforceable and effective legal remedies for individuals must be available following the transfer.

CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd will use Model Contract Clauses, Binding Contract Rules or Binding Corporate Rules for Processor or other contractual arrangements in order to establish adequate safeguards to protect the rights and provide remedies to Data Subjects where their data is transferred outside the EEA.

Data Protection Breach

Any loss of personal data in paper or digital format will be responded to and managed in accordance with CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd data Security Breach Procedures and in compliance with the provisions set out in the Data Protection Commissioner’s personal data Security Breach Code of Practice and available at https://www.dataprotection.ie/docs/Data_Security_Breach_Code_of_Practice/1082.htm

It is essential that all incidents (including suspected incidents) which give rise to the risk of unauthorised disclosure, loss, destruction or alteration or personal data are reported without delay to the DPO.

Incidents can include:

  • Minor incidents which do not actually result in unauthorised disclosure, loss, destruction or alteration of personal data;
  • Major incidents for example: loss or theft of devices such as laptops, files or unauthorised access to the company environment.

A data protection breach can happen for a number of reasons, including:

  • Loss or theft of data or equipment on which data is stored
  • Loss of theft of documents
  • Inappropriate access controls allowing unauthorised use
  • Equipment failure
  • Human error
  • Unforeseen circumstances such as flood or fire
  • A hacking attack
  • Obtaining information from the organisation by deception
  • Misaddressing of e-mails
  • Improper dissemination of information

In the event of a data breach happening, the DPO must be notified immediately.  it must not be assumed that someone else has already notified the breach.

The breach should be notified using a Personal Data Security Breach Form set out in Appendix 1 of this policy.

The DPO will assess the breach and make a decision on the next steps to be taken.

After a review of the breach by the DPO, if the data breached affects the rights of a data subject, the DPO will inform the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner of the breach within 72 hours of CMS Chemstore Engineering Ltd becoming aware of the breach.

A summary of any data breach that occurs, containing the facts relating to the personal data breach, its effects and the remedial action taken, will be recorded in a log maintained by the DPO.

DNV 2.7-2 certified hazardous materials safety store

Chemstore has introduced the world’s first DNV2.7-2 certified hazardous materials safety store. The Firevault module is a next generation design that will significaantly reduce risk, downtime, and liability when working with hazardous materials in zoned areas on an offshore rig.

The DNV2.7-2 Firevault is the only Module Type 5 Functional Group 6 (Flammable Material/Paint Store) available to the Global Oil & Gas sector that allows the Duty Holder to be compliant with DNV2.7-2, the HSE Safety Case Regulation 2015, PFEER 2015 and DSEAR 2002 and meets the needs of the HID Regulatory Model by mitigating or preventing major hazard risks with flammables offshore.

The Firevault provides seamless management of hazardous materials in the most critical environments backed by Chemstore Connect, a powerful software platform for the management of hazardous materials. The Firevault is designed to increase the safety, productivity and profitability of your offshore operations.

 

 

 

Some of the Firevault’s key features:

  • Safe and secure storage for hazardous materials, petroleum, products, solvents, paints, adhesives, lubricants and chemicals.
  • Critical equipment protection enclosure.
  • Suitable for storage of fire and chemical suits, breathing apparatus, personnel protective equipment, emergency recovery equipment, dry suits and critical items.
  • Remote changing facilities for emergency response personnel.
  • Standalone laboratory modules or process units.