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Updated DSHAR: to DGHAR – What it means to your workplace

The HSE recently made full proposals to update the regulations for the transport, storage and use of hazardous materials in harbour areas in the UK & Ireland.

The goal of the amendments is to replace the DSHAR (Dangerous Substances in Harbour Areas) regulations ‘with a new set of shorter, updated regulations. This will be achieved by removing redundant or duplicated sections and then developing a simpler, clearer set of regulations.’

The regulations were initially drafted in 1987 following a tragic oil terminal explosion in Bantry, Co. Cork Ireland which caused the loss of 50 lives (pictured above, The Irish Times 2014).

The existing DSHAR regulations are implemented to control the safe storage, handling, loading and unloading of hazardous materials when entering harbours or areas nearby. The transit of hazardous materials in ports ‘is an intrinsically high hazard activity’.

The proposed amendments have been accelerated to ensure safety standards are maintained at the highest level in the UK & Ireland’s harbours following the disaster in Tianjin, China last year.

These new proposals will firstly be debated by relevant stakeholders as part of the Red Tape Challenge, a Government initiative created to allow the stakeholders to have a say on rules and regulations that affect their daily lives.

The stakeholders who need to pay close attention to the proposed new changes include the following industries:

  • Freight transport by rail
  • Freight transport by road
  • Sea and coastal freight water transport
  • Inland freight water transport
  • Service activities incidental to water transportation
  • Cargo handling

From a hazardous material storage point-of-view these new amendments will affect personnel handling hazardous goods in the port – storage operators.

There are proposed in the following areas:

  • Definitions and title of the regulations
  • Quantity exemptions
  • Entry of dangerous goods into harbour area
  • Marking and navigation of vessels
  • Handling of dangerous substances
  • Liquid dangerous substances in bulk
  • Packaging and labelling
  • Emergency arrangements and untoward incidents
  • Storage Of Dangerous Substances

As the regulations have not been amended since the late 80s there is a crossover between DSHAR and the DSEAR (Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmosphere) regulations 2002. The HSE has proposed to remove the duplications in both regulations for consistency and clarity for the stakeholders involved.

The changes from DSHAR to DGHAR (Dangerous Goods in Harbour Areas) are set to be implemented by government in October 2016 so we highly recommend that you pay close attention to upcoming announcements from the Government bodies in the next few months. You can do this by visiting the HSE website.

For any questions or advice you need on the above contact one of experienced team today. Call 020 8704 1807 or email sales@chemstore.co.uk

CHIP to CLP: Are you compliant?

June 2015 saw the old classification and labelling system, known as CHIP, come to an end. It has now been replaced with the direct acting Classification, Labelling and Packaging Regulation (CLP). So if you haven’t got your house in order, read our article on how to become complaint.

The CLP Regulation came into force across all EU member states (including the UK and Ireland) in June 2009. It replaced the Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply Regulations gradually. From 1 June 2015, nearly all elements of CLP came into force. CLP Regulation ensures the hazards presented by chemicals are clearly communicated to workers and consumers in the EU through classification and labelling.

According to Safety Signs and Signals (revised 2015) from the HSE, it states that when using signs on containers and pipes, each should be ‘labelled with the relevant pictograms in according with the CLP Regulation’.

Therefore all chemical containers must now employ the new labelling system. The old GHS labelling system has been slowly phased out since the new regulations were drafted in 2009, and organisations were given a six-year time window to update to the latest CLP labelling regulations.

 Core changes in compliance

  • As of June 2015, ‘You must use the most appropriate CLP sign and cannot create variations’. The signs and labels must be placed on the side of a container that is clearly visible and needs to be durable.
  • It is strongly advised to keep SDS sheets in close proximity to the storage area. Co-workers need to have immediate access to vital information regarding each chemical in containers and the store, in the case of a spill or injuries caused by exposure to specific chemicals.
  • The old orange and black labels have now been replaced with white and red diamond labels detailed below.
  • ‘Where stores are being used for hazardous chemicals or mixtures, they should be indicated by the relevant safety warning sign taken from paragraph 3.2 of part II of Schedule 1 of the regulations ( the yellow triangle black pictogram warning signs).’

 

Screenshot-2015-11-05-13.02.33

The new hazard labelling system you need to be using

The CLP labelling system was developed to provide striking labelling on goods that works as a clear indication to any personnel who work with dangerous goods in the workplace. The CLP classification labels is something that all your employees should be fully competent with. Chemstore has provided information below on the notable CLP labels:

Chemstore supplies a comprehensive range of safety signs to meet your regulatory requirements, which you can view here.

For any queries you have on hazard identification and storing dangerous goods in the workplace, contact any member of the Chemstore team today. Call 020 8704 1807 or email us on sales@chemstore.co.uk / sales@chemstore.ie

 

 

Seveso III Directive To Be Enacted 1st June 2015

That date of the 1st of June 2015 is fast approaching and again I must endeavor to keep you informed regarding the importance of ensuring our clients are compliant with the SEVESO III Directive.
As previously discussed, from that date it is the responsibility of the operator to ensure that you are compliant. The following are the main points of action, which must be addressed.

  • The Competent Authority must be notified.
  • A Major Accident Prevention Plan or Safety Report. Must be submitted.
  • All necessary measures must be taken to prevent major accidents.
  • All necessary measures must be taken to limit the consequences of a major accident for Humans and the Environment.
  • Information must be made available to all persons liable to be affected by a major accident.
  • The site operator must be in a position to prove to the competent authority at any time that:
  • Major accident hazards have been identified.
  • Appropriate safety measures have been adopted.
  • Persons working on the site have been provided with information, training and equipment to ensure their safety.

The responsibility for ensuring compliance has firmly been placed in the hands of the Site operator. This is why it is so important to have taken all the necessary steps prior to June 1st.
Chemstore will help our clients conform and comply with the SEVESO III Directive. Our team of experts will help you access your obligations under this new legislation. We will recommend best industry practice and will supply you with any advice, product or service you need.

We look forward to working with all our clients to ensure that all people who can be affected by a major accident are informed and protected. Protecting people and the environment must always come first.

CLP Regulation Update
CLP Act NOw

cpl sign
By 1st June 2015 all hazardous mixtures placed on the market will need to be classified, labelled and packaged in accordance with the CLP Regulation.

The Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) Regulation introduced in 2008, provided transitional deadlines to allow for the change over from both the Dangerous Substances Directive (67/548/EC) and the Dangerous Preparations Directive (1999/45/EC). All substances must be classified, labelled and packaged in accordance with the CLP Regulations since 1st December 2012, however mixtures have been given an extended deadline until 1st June 2015. As part of Chemstore’s Chemical Awareness Training, this information has been passed on to the participants in the courses.

Here is a useful link on the classification of substances >>

What does the SEVESO III Directive mean for operating companies?

SEVESO III is the principle piece of legislation relating to the prevention and control of major chemical accidents. Dangerous substances are grouped by their properties i.e. fire and  toxicity.

The DSD (Dangerous Substances Directive) is to be replaced by a European regulation for Globally Harmonised System for the classification, labeling and packaging of chemical substance and mixture (CLP). Currently only “very toxic” and “toxic” materials are covered under the Seveso II directive.

Under Seveso III the catagories 1, 2 and 3 for inhalation exposure routes and catagories 1 and 2 for oral and dermal exposure routes will be covered. Under the new directive more acutely toxic materials previously considered harmful will be brought in under category 3 materials. This will have significant affect on companies who handle such materials.

Some new named substances to come under this new Directive:

  • Anhydrous ammonia
  • Hydrogen sulphide
  • Liquefied flammable gases
  • Petroleum products and alternative fuels

Operating Companies Requirements

Companies will now need to collate appropriate documentation that was not required in the past. They will need to prepare a MAPP (Major Accident Prevention Policy), A Full Safety Report and there will be frequent inspections from the Competent Authority.

Seveso III is now required to adhere to the Aarhus Convention on public information. Companies have to provide information relating to their activities that in this case refers to their storing and handling of Hazardous Materials, their MAPP and their Safety report. They must make available to the public and the relevant authority their process hazards and the control measures they have in place. Seveso III places more emphasis on inspection. Routine inspections of all establishments will be based on their risk profile.

Additional inspections will be carried out in cases of non-compliance.

The SEVESO III Directive comes into law by June 2015. All companies must be compliant by then.

Companies must not wait until this date to take action.

Contact Chemstore now and you will:

REDUCE RISK | REDUCE LIABILITY | REDUCE DOWNTIME

FIREVAULT_SAFETY_GRAPHIC (3)

CLP- Classification, Labeling and Packaging

cpl signBy 1st June 2015 all hazardous mixtures placed on the market will need to be classified, labelled and packaged in accordance with the CLP Regulation.

The Classification, Labeling and Packaging (CPL) Regulation introduced in 2008, provided transitional deadlines to allow for the change over from both the Dangerous Substances Directive (67/548/EC) and the Dangerous Preparations Directive (1999/45/EC).

All substances must be classified, labelled and packaged in accordance with the CLP Regulations since 1st December 2012, however mixtures have been given an extended deadline until 1st June 2015.

As part of Chemstore’s Chemical Awareness Training, this information has been passed on to participants in the courses.

Click image below to view as full sized PDF.

Picture1

 

Article Ref: http://www.hsa.ie/eng/Your_Industry/Chemicals/Classification_and_Labelling/Countdown_to_CLP_compliance/

Poster Ref: http://www.hsa.ie/eng/Publications_and_Forms/Publications/Chemical_and_Hazardous_Substances/CLP_Poster_2_A1_size_.pdf

New EN 14470-2 safety regulations for gas cylinder cabinets

The new Euronorm EN 14470-2 will  replace DIN 12925-2 upon publication.

The new EN 14470-2 standard classifies fire resistance into four classes from G15 up to G90 (fire resistance of 15 up to 90 minutes). Each type of cabinet has to be fire chamber tested. Tests can only be carried out by an authorised material testing institute. Due to the changes and considerably stricter test requirements, safety cabinets approved in accordance with DIN 12925-2 no longer comply with the increased safety standard of EN 14470-2.

The new EN 14470-2 regulations mean the operator now has the same standard for the storage and installation of pressure gas bottles as for the storage of flammable liquids.

The key requirements of EN 14470-2 are:

Applies to gas cylinder storage cabinets with max volume of 220 litres
Denomination of fire resistance changed to G
Classification changed to four classes; G15, G30, G60 and G90
Fire resistance must be proven by an independent institute
Cabinet should be shipped with test certificate or manufacturer declaration of conformity