Gas Cylinder Storage – The Do’s and Dont’s

Introduction – Gas Cylinder Storage

This document provides advice and guidance for safe gas cylinder storage. It gives guidance on the construction and management of gas cylinder stores and provides information on the hazards likely to be encountered.

It shall be used when sitting and constructing storage facilities or when reviewing the safety and suitability of existing storage facilities. It does not preclude the use of alternative designs, materials, and methods when they provide equivalent standards of safety.

The content of this publication is in line with advice from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

If you need any help on a project that involves gas cylinder storage then you need to check out our Gasvault range here.

Scope

This document defines the principles of safe practice for the storage of gas cylinders and gas cylinder bundles and outlines the relevant legal requirements.

Cylinders are never fully empty unless a cylinder is new, de-valved, or following inspection and test where it has not yet been filled with a gas. Therefore, cylinders, containing a gas but regardless of the quantity of gas, shall all be treated in-line with this Code of Practice.

A gas cylinder(s) is deemed to be in storage when:

  • It is not in use; or
  • It is not being transported.

Storage of full and empty LPG cylinders and cartridges. Where a mixture of LPG (>400 kg) and other gas cylinders are stored then the applicable sections of UKLPG CP 7 (60) and this Code should be applied.

Exclusions from this Code of Practice are:

(i) Cylinders in use i.e. connected to the user equipment, or permanently connected for use; for example, fire protection systems and specifically sited emergency response equipment, such as fire extinguishers and self-contained breathing apparatus.

(ii) Cylinders being processed for filling or for periodic inspection and test.

(iii) Medical cylinders in domiciliary use.

(iv) Gas cylinders during carriage by road, rail, air, and sea.

(v) Cylinders permanently manifolded together to form part of a bulk gaseous hydrogen installation.

(vi) Transportable vacuum insulated containers.

(vii) Containers (vessels) for cryogenic liquids.

(viii) Cylinders stored off-shore.

(ix) Aerosols.

Gas Cylinder Identification

Gas Cylinder Idenification Occupational Safety and Health Administration

The cylinder label shall always be used as the primary means of identifying the contents of gas cylinders. The label will identify the product name and the class of hazard (Diamond Hazard Label(s)). Some gas cylinders may have this information stenciled on the body of the cylinder.

Colour coding is a secondary method of identifying certain gases or the properties of others, however, colour coding is not mandatory for most gases but its use is supported by the majority of gas suppliers. Colour coding is typically applied to the shoulder, or curved part, at the top of the cylinder.

Potential Hazards

Gas cylinders present a number of different hazards:

  • Size, shape and weight – Manual handling, security.
  • Pressure hazards.

Size, Shape, and Weight

Gas cylinders are generally heavy and are relatively unstable due to the base diameter to height ratio. Large cylinders can weigh over 100 kg when full they are easily toppled over. Gas cylinders are awkward objects to move safely.

Pressure Hazards

Cylinders contain gases stored under pressure and will have significant stored energy.

Any pressure above atmospheric released from a cylinder has the potential to cause injury to personnel or damage to plant or property.

Pressure can be released by:

  • Inadvertent operation of the outlet valve during handling.
  • Deliberate operation of the outlet valve.
  • Damage to the valve if cylinder topples or falls.
  • Application of heat, for example, fire.
  • Mechanical impact.
  • Leaking valve.
  • Operation of pressure relief devices.
  • Unauthorised modification of the cylinder assembly.
  • Failure of the cylinder wall, for example, from excessive internal and/or external corrosion (by reducing wall thickness).

Cylinder Store – Construction & General Principles

An Image depicting the features of the 8 Gas Cylinder Store equipped with anti corrosion aluminium checker plate, safety signage. i

Risk Assessment

All gas cylinders contain gases under pressure and may present a risk of explosion if not safely handled and stored. Legislation requires that a site-specific risk assessment is required for each gas cylinder store, refer to The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (6) and The Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations (DSEAR). Every storage situation must be considered on its merits and special circumstances may necessitate variations on the recommended requirements.

Consent from the local authority may need to be obtained to store quantities of dangerous substances over certain thresholds. The regulations contain thresholds for both named substances, such as oxygen and hydrogen, and for generic categories of substances (flammable, toxic). For example, the threshold for oxygen storage is 200 tonnes, for flammables 50 tonnes, but for hydrogen only 2 tonnes. In some cases, the percentage / partial faction of thresholds (for example, flammables and oxidants) are additive when determining if consent is required.

Location of the Storage Area

The majority of gas cylinders are designed so that they can be stored in the open air and, as such, they will not be adversely affected by inclement weather.

Indoor Gas Cylinder Storage Cylinder Cabinet

Storage areas should be located in an external area where there is good natural ventilation. Adjacent buildings, structures, and geographical features may adversely affect natural ventilation and their effect should be taken into account during the risk assessment. The store should not be located in low lying areas; where gases may accumulate.

Storage within a building is not recommended. Where storage indoors cannot be avoided please see below. Internal storage locations should be at ground level and in the following order of preference:

(i) A bespoke stand-alone dedicated, adequately naturally ventilated building.

(ii) A dedicated room sealed from the rest of the building, adequately naturally ventilated to the outside, only accessible from an external door(s).

(iii) A dedicated room, adjacent to an outside wall, inside a building, adequately naturally ventilated to the outside, sealed from other areas of normal occupancy.

(iv) A dedicated room, inside a building, with forced air ventilation, sealed from other areas of normal occupancy.

(v) In a building, as far as is practicable away from normal work locations.

The location of the store shall take account of the minimum recommended separation distances, refer to Section 5.4.1. Cylinder stores are to be located away from the site designated emergency exits and escape routes.

Gas cylinder storage areas should be segregated from other stores. The risk assessment shall take due regard of the potential hazards of the gases being stored and the risk from other hazardous processes or storage sites that may impact on a cylinder store. It shall also consider the potential for impact due to vehicle movements.

Storage locations should be sited at ground level. Where cylinders are stored at any other level this shall be specifically covered in the risk assessment. If the store is located at another level then consideration needs to be given to providing an area to allow vehicles to collect and deliver cylinders, cylinder movements between levels and the impact in the event of an incident, for example, gas leakage, fire, access for emergency services, proximity to people, etc.

The risk assessment shall take account of both underground and overground services. The location shall be chosen so that it is not directly beneath overhead power or other cables and where it will allow access for vehicles and other plant machinery without the risk of them coming into contact with power or other cables.

Each storage area and its boundaries shall be well defined. The footprint of the store shall allow space for the expected quantity of gas cylinders being stored as well as for the safe movement and handling of the gas cylinders, including access for mechanical handling equipment.

Appropriate access to the site will be required. This will include access for delivery vehicles and the emergency services.

The location of the storage area should consider the security of cylinders to avoid theft and to prevent tampering with the cylinders.

Storage Area Layout and Separation Distances

The physical dimensions of the storage area shall take into account the storage requirements, for example, grouping by hazard classification, full/empty or unserviceable cylinders and providing adequate space for access and egress, for safe manual handling operations and the use of mechanical handling equipment.

Means shall be provided to secure cylinders to prevent them from falling over, for example, pallets, chains, lashing, etc.

Minimum Recommended Separation Distances

Appendix 2 shows the minimum recommended separation distances between cylinders, the store(s) and other features.

Where there are space restraints a permanent physical partition may be used to help achieve the required minimum recommended separation distances. The height of the partition should be relevant to the hazard, however, it should be not less than 2 meters high, unless for non-fire hazards a lower partition can be justified through risk assessment. The required minimum recommended separation distance can include the length of the sides of the partition, as shown in Figure 1. Such partitions should be imperforate and constructed of suitable materials, for example, solid masonry or concrete. Where protecting against fire hazards, they should be constructed to achieve at least 30 minutes’ fire-resistance for best practices in gas cylinder storage.

Correct Seperaration Distances

Where the wall separates vulnerable populations from the cylinders (not including inert gases), the fire resistance provided should be a minimum of 60 minutes.

Figure 1: Use of a partition to achieve the minimum recommended separation distances

Within Figure 1 the minimum recommended separation distances may include the distance measured around the sides of the partition by determining the sum of A + B + C.

If flammable gas cylinders are stored against a building wall the area up to 2 m either side of the storage area and up to 9 m above ground should be imperforate and of a minimum of 30 minutes fire resisting construction.

When planning the gas cylinder storage facility, adequate handling space shall be allowed. The total amount of floor space required will depend on the quantity and the size of the cylinders, and the handling equipment to be used during their movement. Refer to Section 6 and Section 8.

Floor

The floor should be level and constructed from non-combustible, non-porous material. All floor surfaces shall be constructed so that they can be maintained in a clean manner.

Obstacles such as expansion joints, steps, and drainage systems, shall not impede cylinder handling operations.

The floor shall be of sufficient strength to support the weight of the gas cylinders/gas cylinder pallets, plus any mechanical handling aids employed on gas cylinder handling.

The floor should be laid to prevent the accumulation of water so that stored cylinders do not rest in standing water and risk being subjected to corrosion.

Roof

Cylinders are designed for outdoor storage, however, some applications require protected storage conditions for quality, hygiene and security reasons, for example, analytical and medical gases. Cylinders may also need additional protection from local environmental conditions.

Where required, the roofing shall be designed to prevent gas pockets from accumulating, for example, gaps between the wall and sloping roof, natural ventilation in the roof apex etc.

General Security

All stores containing gas cylinders shall be secure and access shall be restricted to authorized personnel. This may be achieved by securing the site with a boundary fence with lockable gates or by securing individual stores. Dependant on the site security requirements both conditions may be required.

Suitable security arrangements shall take into account the classification of the gases and the quantities being stored. The security arrangements shall include appropriate physical and management security controls to prevent unauthorized access, theft, tampering, arson, vandalism and to effectively monitor the usage of gases, as well as any specific local considerations. Keys for each store shall be kept in a secure location and only issued to authorized persons; a log should be kept.

Where electronic security systems, for example, alarms, are installed comply with the electrical requirements on site.

The security perimeter shall meet the ventilation requirements and be not less than 1.8 meters high.

Where the gas cylinder store is enclosed, a suitable emergency exit(s) may be required dependant on the size and/or layout of the store.

All persons handling gas cylinders shall have appropriate training, as required.

Where high consequence dangerous goods, such as toxic gases, are stored on site a security plan shall be drawn up and implemented in compliance with the Health & Safety department.

Ventilation

Ventilation is required to ensure that any small leakage of gas is adequately dispersed and will prevent a hazardous atmosphere being created. An outdoor store with open or ventilated sides and is considered to provide adequate ventilation and is the preferred option.

Where a store may have restricted ventilation, due to, for example, adjacent buildings or a wall acting as a store boundary, it is necessary to ensure that there is through and thorough ventilation in all areas inside the store.

A semi-enclosed store may be considered ‘outdoors’ if it consists of up to three adjacent solid sides, with a roof, provided at least 25 % of the perimeter is constructed to ensure that ventilation is not impaired, for example, meshed cladding.

Where the configuration of the store restricts air flow, the installation of high and low-level vents should be considered to ensure a regular change of air. The design of a roof shall meet the ventilation requirements. Minimum recommended separation distances should be considered when locating vents.

A store with less than 25 % of the perimeter open is to be considered an indoor store.

Examples of store design are displayed below.

If a store is located against a building wall, then the risk assessment shall take account of the likelihood of escaped gas entering the building, and the method of entry, for example, an overhanging roof, cellars, windows, air intakes, etc.

Gas Cylinders Storage

Access

Gas Cylinder Cage

The storage area should be located so that it is readily accessible for cylinder movements with manual handling distances kept to a minimum and clear access maintained at all times for deliveries and the emergency services.

Access to the delivery and storage area(s) is to be kept clear, with no parking allowed, except for the loading and unloading of cylinders. No vehicles are to be allowed within the minimum recommended separation distance.

Aisles should be provided to allow safe access to cylinders, to facilitate good housekeeping, stock control and for the ease of handling. They should be a minimum of 1 metre wide.

The layout of the storage area should allow for the safe movement of gas cylinder handling trolleys, forklift trucks, and any other powered vehicles. The layout shall take account of the separation of personnel and vehicles with appropriate traffic routes defined.

Where the gas cylinder store is enclosed suitable access and egress shall be provided. The risk assessment (refer to Section 5.1) shall determine the maximum travel distance to enable escape and therefore identify the number of exits required.

Where installed, all designated emergency exits shall open in the direction of escape and shall be fitted with panic furniture of a type not requiring a key, card, or code to open. They are to provide an unobstructed means of escape and in operation shall not obstruct any other escape route. These exits shall be properly identified by signage and maintained in a serviceable condition at all times. Ensure that emergency exits are secure and cannot be opened from the external side of the store (whilst still allowing emergency escape from the inside of the store).

Lighting

The area should have adequate lighting to assist in providing a safe work environment, to allow the identification of the cylinder contents, signage and where necessary to assist with security. Where artificial lighting is used it shall give suitable colour rendering to enable colour labelling to be easily recognised by persons with normal colour vision.

Where required, emergency lighting shall be to the requirements of BS 5266 (28).

Electrical Equipment

Only electrical equipment that is necessary for the safe and practical operation of the gas cylinder store shall be installed. As a minimum, all electrical installations shall conform to BS 7671 (31), Requirements for electrical installations. IET wiring regulations. Where flammable or oxidising gases are stored the risk assessment (refer to Section 5.1) is to determine whether protected electrical equipment is required, if so refer to BS EN 60079, Part 14 (33), Explosive atmospheres. Electrical installations, design, selection, and erection.

Fire Safety Requirements

A responsible person shall carry out a Fire Safety Risk Assessment on all gas cylinder storage areas to determine the hazard and the risk associated with a fire originating from a gas cylinder and/or a fire impacting on a gas cylinder(s). The findings from which are to be incorporated into the Site Fire Safety Management Plan that is to be implemented and maintained. As necessary, advice should be sought from the Fire and Rescue Service. The risk control measures identified shall be incorporated into the construction of the gas cylinder store(s).

The location of each gas cylinder store shall be recorded within the site’s hazardous locations record. This record should include information on the products stored, their maximum quantities and their hazardous classification. This should be updated on a regular basis. This is to be made available to the emergency services in the event of an incident.

Training

Training Presentation

All personnel who are required to handle and store gas cylinders shall receive suitable information and instruction regarding the hazards associated with gas cylinders and the gases being stored, and provided with the necessary skills and knowledge to carry out their job safely.

It is the duty of the employer to ensure their persons are adequately trained and to establish competency. It is recommended that a training programme is carried out under a formalised system where an acceptable level of competency has to be achieved. Records shall be kept of the training provided and the competence level achieved. The training programme shall make provision for periodic re-training.

Training should be reviewed and/or updated following:

  • A related accident or incident.
  • The receipt of gases which have not previously been used on site.
  • Change to guidance or information previously provided.
  • The appointment of new and/or transferred employees.

All persons engaged in the storage of gas cylinders shall have training commensurate with their responsibilities and should include, but not confined to the below subjects.

  • Identification of the cylinder and its contents.
  • Properties and hazards of gases, including pressure.
  • Cylinder and valve types.
  • Movement of cylinders, including local carriage.
  • Stock management.
  • Store management.
  • Actions to be taken in an emergency situation.

Specific training and certification requirements are required for persons handling fluorinated gases.

If you require further help from the team at Chemstore then get in touch with one of our sales engineers today!

Leading university chemistry department specifies walk in flammable storage solution Five steps for safer storage of flammable substances

While there is widespread appreciation of the need to store flammable substances safely warehouse fires are still a regular occurrence and incorrect storage of flammable substances is often found to play a part in these incidences.

When such a fire occurs it is not necessarily the case that there is a complete disregard for safety, but there are some common mistakes that we witness during site visits that put premises and people at increased risk.

One example is the assumption that storing drums containing flammable substances in an off-the-shelf chemical store means they are safe when this may well not be the case. Often standard stores don’t offer thermal protection which means once the weather heats up the products inside the store do too at which point they can start to give off a flammable vapour and become hazardous.

This is a very simple example but the reality is that storing flammable substances is rarely straight forward with every site having a bespoke set of factors that need to be taken into consideration. It’s therefore useful to consult a hazardous storage expert to ensure that you find the most appropriate solution for your needs but this doesn’t mean you can’t do some ground work first to help you build a picture of your requirements.

The most useful reference tool you have when looking at how to store a flammable substance safely is the product’s Safety Data Sheet (SDS) which will either be provided with the product or be available online – if in doubt contact the manufacturer/supplier. Safety Data Sheets can seem overwhelming at first glance but once you know what you are looking for they are actually quite easy to navigate and the following steps can help.

1. Identify the chemical. First of all, you need to know what you’re dealing with so refer to sections 1& 2 of the Safety Data Sheets to identify the substances you want to store and their associated hazards. Once you have this information use section 9 of the Safety Data Sheet to identify the flashpoint of the substance – make sure you are clear about the difference between the flashpoint and the auto-ignition temperature as it is a common mistake to get these confused. A misconception is that the flashpoint of a liquid is the temperature at which it auto ignites – this is incorrect – the temperature at which it auto ignites is called the autoignition temperature. The flashpoint is the temperature at which the liquid gives off flammable vapour. It is not the liquid but the vapour that ignites, so storing a product below this temperature means that no flammable vapour is created. Controlling the temperature also has another benefit that the flammable or hazardous material may work better in process or application when stored at a certain temperature, this temperature can be found in Section 7 of the Safety Data Sheet.

2. Consider compatibility. If you are storing more than one substance, consider whether they are compatible as certain chemicals need to be segregated within a storage facility.  Refer to Section 10 of the Safety Data Sheet to identify incompatible materials.

3. Define the application. Consider how you are using the substances as this will affect the level of risk. Bulk storage of unopened items in sealed containers poses a much lower risk of giving off a flammable vapour than storing products in use where a seal has been broken and lids may not be replaced properly. That said, manufactured sealed containers can cause an issue when stored above the flashpoint and the container is trying to release the vapour because the vapour has nowhere to go which will create pressurised containers that eventually burst or go bang. Remember that you need to think about what will happen to your store if a fire breaks out elsewhere in your facility as well as the risk of a fire breaking out within the store itself.

4. Combat the risks. Think about how you can combat these risks using a hierarchy of hazard controls approach. First, consider whether you could use an alternative substance that poses less of a risk. If this isn’t possible think about what you can do to reduce the risks. Firstly think about thermal protection and temperature control – ensuring a product is stored at the correct temperature as per the Safety Data Sheet will help to prevent flammable vapours from occurring – you also need a way of monitoring this temperature – preferably via a remote system that will alert you of any critical changes in temperature. Next consider whether you need an extraction systems to remove vapour in the event that it does get released, once again this needs to include VOC/gas detection monitoring so you receive an alert if there is a rise in vapour so you can address the situation. The next step is to think about fire detection systems to raise the alarm if you have a fire – a double knock system can reduce false alarms so this might be worth considering. Your unit also needs to include the most appropriate fire suppression media which varies depending on the hazard and will be highlighted in Section 5 of the Safety Data Sheet. Frustratingly sometimes the information within these sections can seem contradictory, for example within the Safety Data Sheet for acetone Section 5 recommends using water sprays but not to use water jets – this is why consulting an expert in hazardous storage is advisable.  There is also currently some confusing and contradictory information surrounding the most appropriate media for extinguishing lithium-ion battery fires. This reiterates why it is important to consult a hazardous storage expert with experience in these areas.

5. Have a fire response plan. Anyone storing flammable substances needs to be able to instantly know what’s in their building and what you’ve done to protect your site and the surrounding neighbourhood so ensure you have a detailed inventory that can be accessed quickly in the event of an incident. For example Chemstore’s cloud-based hazardous material management software system, Chempli, which can be specified with a unit, includes a QR code that can be featured outside a building or at a security gate enabling the user to instantly access the relevant information in the event of an incident.

Conclusion

This is a very basic guide to some of the factors that need to be taken into account when planning the storage of flammable substances but hopefully it provides enough information to give you an understanding of the needs on your site. If you are in any doubt about your current storage arrangements, or you are in the process if specifying a new system, contact Chemstore Engineering today for a free site survey.

Opinion: Electric car revolution welcome but safety is paramount

Chemstore UK welcomes the Government’s announcement that all new vehicles in Britain will be electric from 2035 and the positive impact this will have on the environment, however when it comes to the technology behind electric vehicles – lithium-ion batteries – it must be remembered that safety is paramount.

Lithium-ion batteries have quickly become ubiquitous powering so many of our every day devices from mobile phones and laptops to power tools. However their risks are still poorly understood.

Lithium-ion batteries are now a common contributor to household fires and they have become a serious hazard in waste and recycling centres as people casually dispose of them within their household waste with little understanding of the dangers they pose. They are also present a serious hazard within industrial premises.

One major issue is that they are vulnerable to thermal runaway, an uncontrollable chain reaction during which the high heat created by the failing cell can develop to the next cell, causing it to also become thermally unstable. Once ignited, the batteries can also emit toxic fumes and battery cells can reignite hours after an initial fire has been extinguished making them extremely unpredictable for the fire service to deal with.

Why lithium-ion battery fires start is unclear but manufacturing defects and contamination, damage in transit and over charging are all thought to play a role. If they are not appropriately segregated there is also the risk of them being affected by a fire that has started elsewhere which can have devastating consequences.

More questions than answers

The reality is that there are more questions than answers at the moment about lithium-ion battery safety and even the fire service is learning as we go. Research is underway which will hopefully provide some clarity but it is prudent to manage lithium-ion batteries with the utmost caution until we fully understand their risks, handling them with care and keeping them in specialised safe storage facilities, such as Chemstore’s Electrovault range, segregated from other hazards.

As trusted specialists in hazardous materials, at Chemstore UK, we are already working with leaders in the automotive and motorsports industry to ensure they are handling and storing their lithium-ion batteries in line with best practice as it is currently understood.

However whether you are an electric car manufacturer handling and storing vast quantities of lithium-ion batteries, or just dealing with this technology in small amounts, it is important not to overlook this omnipresent risk.

Chemstore UK offers a range of indoor and outdoor handling and storage solutions for lithium-ion batteries as well as providing bespoke storage options. Contact us today on 020 8704 1807 to find out more.

Chemstore to launch Chempli at ChemUK2020
Chemstore, the hazardous materials experts, will be launching ‘Chempli’, a software tool for hazardous materials management that reduces risk, improves compliance and quality control, and simplifies maintenance at ChemUK 2020 which takes place on the 13th & 14th May.

Chempli features a remote monitoring system that enables full temperature control, fire alarm visibility and data logging from any location and at any time, which is critical for the safe storage of hazardous substances as well as for quality control.

The Chempli online portal can be accessed via a QR code found on any of Chemstore’s range of hazardous materials storage solutions including: Firevault, Corvault, Electrovault, Thermovault, Hazvault and Gasvault. Chempli can also be accessed via a web browser.

Visit Chemstore on stand G27 to find out more.
www.chemicalukexpo.com
Free chemical storage surveys

Chemstore, the hazardous materials experts, are currently offering free, no-obligation chemical storage surveys throughout the UK.

Ensure your chemical storage arrangements are compliant with latest health & safety regulations; book a survey with your local chemical storage expert today and get your site in order for 2020.

Questions answered during a chemical storage survey include:

1. Where should chemicals be stored?

2. What is the requirement for storing chemicals?

3. What are the requirements for safe chemical storage?

3. Which hazardous substances should be stored separately?

Call the Chemstore team and book you free survey today. Tel: 020 8704 1807

Company fined following extensive fire at chemical site

Chemical company LMA Services Ltd has been sentenced for safety breaches after a fire which quickly took hold of buildings and storage areas at the site.

Leeds Magistrates’ Court heard that on 30 June 2016, the fire started during a chemical dispensing operation in a Warehouse on Halifax Way, Pocklington Industrial Estate, Pocklington. Heptane, a highly flammable liquid, was being decanted from a bulk storage container into 4-litre metal cans. The operator dropped the can he was filling, exited the warehouse quickly and raised the alarm. He did not suffer any serious injury. The fire spread quickly and destroyed the warehouse, the adjacent warehouse and an external storage area between the two.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the process involved placing a bulk container of heptane onto racking at a height of about 1.5m. A table was then positioned beneath the bulk container onto which a small electrical weighing scale was positioned. Metal cans were placed onto the scale and an employee filled the cans by weight by manually operating a tap on the bulk container in the warehouse building.

A flammable vapour created during the process came into contact with an ignition source causing the vapour to ignite. HSE’s investigation found that the most likely source of ignition was a spark from the electrical weighing scales.

LMA Services Ltd of Halifax Way, Pocklington Industrial Estate, Pocklington pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 6 (3) of the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002. The company has been fined £14,000 and ordered to pay £2,377 in costs.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Dave Stewart commented: “The risks associated with the decanting operation were not fully understood by the company. There were potential ignition sources present within the area where a flammable vapour was likely to occur.

“This case highlights the importance of assessing risks associated with flammable atmospheres. Employers should ensure that adequate measures are taken to reduce the formation of flammable atmospheres so far as is reasonably practicable, and to ensure that only suitable electrical equipment is used in areas where a flammable atmosphere may be present.”

For advice and guidance on safe flammable liquid storage, or to book a free site survey, contact Chemstore UK today on 0208 704 1807.

 

Fire-proof lithium-ion battery box

Chemstore, the hazardous materials experts, have added a fire-proof case for the safe storage and transport of lithium-ion batteries to their lithium-ion battery storage range.

The Zarges K470 battery box is a high quality aluminium container which is suitable for up to 3 lithium ion batteries of 814 Wh. The box is equipped with fireproof padding and absorbent material and has been successfully fire tested to ensure flame does not spread to adjacent batteries.

The box was originally designed for transporting damaged lithium-ion batteries and is tested and approved as hazardous goods packaging in accordance with UN requirements therefore it can be transported on public roads.

Chemstore already offers an outdoor storage option for lithium-ion batteries (the Electrovault) and an indoor storage option (the ION-LINE) so the Zarges K470 battery box is the perfect addition to the range.

Chemstore Managing Director, Mike Brodie comments: “Lithium-ion battery storage is a complex area with best practice guidance still evolving and misinformation unfortunately quite commonplace. Chemstore Engineering has fast become one of the leading product specialists in this area so we are delighted to further broaden our lithium-ion battery storage range with the addition of the Zarges battery box.”

Watch this video to find out more.

Contact Chemstore Engineering on 020 8704 1807 or email  sales@chemstore.co.uk to find out more about our range of lithium-ion battery storage products and to arrange a free site survey.

The trouble with stockpiling

According to the latest report from IHS Markit and the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply a number of firms are raising purchasing again as they restart Brexit preparations.

Chemstore UK has seen lots of examples of stockpiling during site surveys this year and we have identified some common safety concerns. Firstly, many companies are stockpiling hazardous chemicals without anywhere to safely store them, so this is something procurement departments need to be aware of before ordering surplus supplies. In addition, where companies are increasing production to meet stockpiling demands there is likely to be an increase in waste; a common situation is for waste to be left on site until a full trailer or lorry load can be filled yet no safe allocation has been made for this volume of hazardous waste. An example of small scale safe segregated waste storage can be seen here).

We urge anyone holding or producing additional hazardous materials to carefully consider their storage arrangements and if in doubt please get in touch. Call 020 8704 1807 or  email sales@chemstore.co.uk

Investing in additional safe storage facilities can be an essential part of contingency planning. Chemstore UK also offers rental options.

Get ready for winter with temperature-controlled storage

How do colder months affect chemical storage in the workplace?

As winter approaches and colder temperatures start to hit, it’s worth remembering that climate has an impact on quality and safety.

BP2
A fuel-testing module supplied by Chemstore to a BP UK site

Quality control
Temperature control is a critical factor when storing quantities of valuable products such as solvents, adhesives and coatings. It is essential in many industrial processes to maintain the optimal temperatures for these products to obtain the highest product quality for goods produced. For processes such as paint mixing, adhesive appliances and ingredient storage – companies need correct temperature controlled storage that is both compliant and fit for purpose.

Chemstore specialises in the manufacture of bespoke temperature controlled chemical stores that can be designed specifically for your product requirements.

Click here to see one of Chemstore’s temperature controlled solutions in action featuring the new touch-screen delta control panel.

For more information, just contact one of our sales team today and get prepared for the winter ahead. Call +44 20 8704 1807 or  email sales@chemstore.co.uk