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A Brief Guide to Acid Storage

October 13, 2014

The following acts as a brief reference guide to your acid storage. 

1. Ascertain the nature of the acids:

  • Inorganic also known as mineral, the most common are Hydrochloric, Sulphuric and Nitric acids.
  • Organic acids for example, Acetic acid being the most common.
  • Flammable acid, the only common example is Acetic acid.

2. Acids are frequently supplied as aqueous solutions. For example, the higher the concentration of an acid the greater the potential of fumes, which in turn can be very corrosive.

3. Always refer to the Material Safety Data Sheet which gives directions regarding storage and handling advice. Acids must be separated from other chemical types such as bases.

4. Having established the nature and quantity of acids present, and measured available storage space, you are now in a position to recommend specific asecos cabinets.

  • Where acids are mildly corrosive the CS Line can be considered, but as they contain some metal components corrosion resistance is limited.
  • For stronger acids use the SL Line which is highly recommended.
  • In both cases extraction is recommended. Where segregation is required there are a number of products which may be considered such as the SL, CS or K Lines.

5. Check the client requirements for interior furniture within the cabinet, this depends on the size and number of containers being stored. With respect to storing acids if possible always recommend PE coated shelves or plastic pull out drawers if available, it helps reduce the risk of corrosion to those components.

6. We advise that in all cases cabinets are to be ventilated where acids are stored, acidic fumes are corrosive, so for example non-metallic components are to be used in the extraction hosing. In 2014 asecos are releasing a recirculating UFA extractor for acid fumes as an option.

7. Establish where the cabinet is to be delivered to, either to point of use to behind first door (goods-in).

Acid storage 1

Acid storage 2

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